Meet Moises, Mbawa Health Center Volunteer

excerpt from a report by Tito Jequicene, MD and Jonathan White

Mobile Clinic increases access to health services at Mbawa Health Center

Moises Pedro Monteiro, 50, is married and the father of a 16-year-old son. He lives in the town of Mbawa and has been a volunteer with the Mbawa Health Center for over five years. Moises has given lectures and sensitized the community on disease prevention and the importance of going to a health center as soon as you have any signs of illness. Moises recounts that:

“Before the arrival of the Mobile Clinic, I had many problems with the community. After lectures I conducted, people came to the hospital, and often received transfer slips or referrals to go to the district headquarters in Namacurra, which is 30 km from Mbawa, or at best, the rural hospital in Macuse that is about 13 km away. I myself had to take samples for suspected TB cases to Macuse, by bike, and sometimes even accompanied by patients who were very sick and unable to walk. With the arrival of the Mobile Clinic last September, everything changed. Most diseases are now being treated right here in Mbawa with medicines readily available.”

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Kenya: Economic Development through Agricultural Training, Partnership with Development in Gardening (DIG)

excerpt from a progress report prepared by Katherine Falk and Jonathan White

The Lwala Community Alliance is a non-profit health and development agency working in Nyanza Province, Kenya. Supported by Real Medicine Foundation Kenya and World Children’s Fund, the organization provides 33,000 patient visits each year through the Lwala Community Hospital. The mission of the organization is to meet the health needs of all people living in north Kamagambo, including its poorest. The hospital is part of a larger effort to achieve holistic development in Lwala, including educational and economic development.

One of the main project objectives is building the capacity of community members in income generating activities. Through a partnership with DIG (Development in Gardening), the Lwala Community Alliance is training farmers in agriculture and nutrition to maintain diverse, sustainable gardens.

Economic Development through Agricultural Training

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Thanks to IRD, Anemia Can Be Prevented in Bogo City

update from the Main Health Office, Bogo City, Philippines

The Bogo City Health Office has limited funds for the purchase of Ferrous Sulfate tablets.  If there are supplies available, the pregnant women are the top priority, however, the availability of the iron vitamins is not sustained so there are times that those pregnant women have to buy the Ferrous Sulfate tablets on their own. Unfortunately, most of the pregnant women seeking prenatal care in our health centers are not financially capable and most of them stop taking iron vitamins during their pregnancy.

Upon the receipt of the donated bottles of Ferrous Sulfate tablets from RMF and International Relief and Development, there is continuous supply of the iron vitamins to all our pregnant women starting from the 1st trimester of their pregnancy until their lactating period.

THANK YOU to RMF/IRD, ANEMIA is being prevented in our locality.

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Pakistan: Polio Vaccine Campaign and Workers Are a Target for Extremist Violence

Update: Just today the Pakistani army has agreed to provide security to those providing polio vaccinations following a series of attacks against individuals involved in the campaign. Click here for the full story.

by Rubina Mumtaz, BDS, MPH, Country Director, Pakistan

POLIO CAMPAIGN

Pakistan is one of three countries (Nigeria and Afghanistan) in the world where Polio has yet to be eradicated. According to the Global Polio Eradication Initiative, Pakistan stepped up its eradication efforts and numbers fell from 173 cases in 2011 to 58 in 2012. Unfortunately, with the advent of 2013, Pakistan became the most hazardous country in the world in terms of Polio where all persons involved in Polio drops distribution from grass root field workers, the organizational employees dealing with EPI as well as the security workers accompanying the polio workers have been killed by terrorists across the country. Beginning in December 2012 where 8 Polio drop workers and 4 aid workers were slain in Karachi and KPK respectively, these horrendous senseless attacks have not ceased or eased even slightly.

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Pakistan’s Agra Health Project Closed: The Lives We Touched

by Rubina Mumtaz BDS, MPH, Country Director, Pakistan

In August 2013, three years after the fateful floods of 2010, District Charsadda was the last to be struck off the list of flood affected areas of KPK and the government announced that the road to recovery was at last present. The Pakistan People’s Health Initiative (PPHI), a semi-government body had signed an MOU with the KPK Health Department to adopt all the BHUs in the main districts of Charsadda, Nowshera and Swabi, effectively revitalizing the BHU in Union Council Agra. Given RMF’s mission to avoid duplicating services, the primary health care services in the Agra Health Project were closed. Read the full report here.

The Lives We Touched

Parvaiz

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A Remarkable Recovery: Pablo

Pablo Ng’asike, a 13-month-old boy from Loareng Village in Turkana County, was admitted to Lodwar District Hospital with Kwashiorkor (a form of malnutrition that occurs when there is not enough protein in the diet), severe anemia, oedema+++ (also known as dropsy, is where there is an excessive build-up of fluid in the body’s tissues), dermatitis (inflammation of the skin) and very high fever. Pablo is the 2nd born in a family with six children. The mother and father are alive but very sickly. The mother is a housewife and the father is a herdsman. On admission Pablo had massive swelling of his face, high fever and was gasping in pain. (warning: graphic image below)

Treatment & Medication:

Septrin 1.5ml OD

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RMF Reunites 2nd Year Nursing Student Peter Atiep with his Family

written by Dr. Taban Martin Vitale

Peter Atiep is a South Sudanese national from Upper Nile State, Baliet County. A second year nursing student of Juba College of Nursing and Midwifery (JCONAM), Peter is married to Ajak Abe Nyok and they have 5 children (3 girls and 2 boys): Abuk Atiep Kur, a 10-year-old girl; Awol Atiep Kur, an 8-year-old boy; Monyuat Atiep Kur, a 6-year-old boy; Nyalueth Atiep Kur, a 3-year-old girl and Nyanlong Atiep Kur a baby girl of 3 months.

When the fight broke out in Juba in mid-December 2013, Peter and his family were in his home town Baliet, which was overrun by the opposition forces on January 11th, 2014. As everyone took cover and ran for their safety, Peter was separated from his wife and they were not able to locate each other at that time. Peter ran with the first three children (Abuk, Awol and Monyuat) and his wife ran with the 3-year-old child and the baby. Peter finally made his way to Palogue (Malut County in Upper Nile State), then to Juba on January 19th, 2014 and immediately proceeded to Kakuma refugee camp in Kenya. He left the children there with a relative and returned to Juba to continue with his studies at JCONAM. Fortunately, Peter managed to connect with his wife who took refuge in Renk County (Upper Nile State) and requested she come to Palogue where there is an operational airstrip with regular Dar Petroleum flights. Peter desperately wanted to reunite with his wife and children but was unable to afford to airlift his wife/children from Palogue to Juba and to Kakuma to reunite with the three children.

During this critical moment, RMF stepped in and facilitated the transportation of Peter’s wife and the children from Palogue to Juba by air on March 28th, 2014 and then to Kakuma refugee camp by road on March 30th, 2014. Peter confirmed to RMF the arrival of his wife and children to Kakuma.

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CEO Dr. Martina Fuchs’ 2014 Trip to Uganda: School Support

When the Kenyan refugees arrived at the Kiryandongo Refugee Settlement in 2008, there was very little support in terms of school fees for their children, and there was no nursery school at the settlement. RMF stepped forward to establish a school support program to cover fees and supplies for Nursery, Primary and Secondary School children of the Kenyan refugee community at Kiryandongo. In the subsequent years, students from (South) Sudan, Congo, Burundi and Rwanda have been accepted into our program as well. RMF pays a portion of the tuition fees, school uniforms, school supplies, and exam fees for the students of parents unable to afford the fees. We also cover the cost and travel expenses for the final examination tests for the senior high school students. Up to 1,602 students have been sponsored per month.

The refugee children we currently support are from Kenya, Congo, Burundi, Sudan and attend the following schools in the settlement: Beth Cole Nursery School; Day Star Nursery School; Arnold Primary School; Can Rom Primary School; Panyadoli Secondary School. We also continued to provide funding for the annual registration of candidates in Senior Level Four and Senior Level Six that are in our sponsorship program and facilitated candidates taking their national exams in the city of Masindi.

The massive influx of South Sudanese refugee children has created an additional tremendous need. Many of these children are severely traumatized and need urgent psychological trauma support. In many of the class rooms we visited on February 24 and 25, South Sudanese children outnumbered all others. Their stories are heartbreaking. To help, please visit our website.

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CEO Dr. Martina Fuchs’ 2014 Trip to Uganda: Panyadoli Health Centers

PANYADOLI HEALTH CENTER III – KIRYANDONGO REFUGEE CAMP

This Level III Health Center’s target population is about 60,000 residents in the Bweyale region, including 41,000 Ugandan IDPs, Bududa survivors, and Refugees from Kenya, Sudan, Congo, Burundi and Rwanda which are the main target population. In the past, the large influxes included that of 10,000 new Ugandan IDPs in October 2010 and another 15,000 joined the Kiryandongo Resettlement Camp at the end of May 2011.

The Panyadoli Health Center treats as many as 3,000 patients per month, for a wide variety of issues including malaria, malnutrition, maternal and child care, and HIV/AIDS; cases requiring tertiary care are referred to the closest county hospital.

With an additional influx of more than 12,000 refugees since December 2013 (as of February 24), and an expected additional 40,000 coming, resources are seriously strained.

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CEO Dr. Martina Fuchs’ 2014 Trip to Uganda: Kiryandongo Refugee Camp

In the evening on February 23 RMF’s South Sudan and Uganda teams parted ways and Martina and crew drove to the Kiryandongo Refugee/ Resettlement Camp.

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RMF has been serving Ugandans, Ugandan IDPs and refugees from other African nations since April 2008, when the RMF team first arrived from the US to the Mulanda Refugee Transit Centre, giving emergency assistance to the large influx of Kenyan Refugees escaping political violence in Kenya.  This emergency help was initially in the form of psychological trauma and social support, school fee subsidies, clothing, care kits and seeds for the refugees to start their own small gardens.  During this initial phase of emergency assistance, help was also provided to the surrounding local Ugandan communities of Tororo through the Mella Health Centre, St. Anthony’s Hospital, the Mama Kevina Comprehensive School, and the youth in the slums surrounding the Mama Kevina School.

When the Kenyan refugees were eventually transferred from the Mulanda Transit Centre to the Kiryandongo Refugee Settlement in mid-2008, the RMF team followed and continued to provide school support, medicines and medical supplies, and other projects as needed.  RMF also continued to maintain its presence in Tororo.

Since those early days, RMF has greatly expanded its support and development initiatives at the Kiryandongo Settlement to both Ugandan IDPs and refugees from numerous other African nations with Vocational Training, Water System Repair and upgrades, School Fee Support, Support of Kiryandongo’s Panyadoli Health Center with continuous medicine and medical supplies as well as personnel support; RMF also continues its support to the Mama Kevina Boarding School and Orphanage, and is now also constructing additional buildings on the school’s campus.

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